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Paintings

Description of the painting by Isaac Levitan "At the pool"


Canvas "At the pool" was painted by Isaac Levitan in 1892. This painting is the property of the State Tretyakov Gallery. Many people call this painting gloomy and sad, full of anxiety and hidden despair.

According to critics, the clouds rising on a cloudy sky and the setting sun symbolize the seal and depressive state of the author. Mysticism and mystery are attributed to the painting due to the near, hidden by twilight, sprawling forests. They seem to step on the viewer closely and, if not for the shaky bridge, are ready to absorb it with their dark, cold foliage. The spherical bushes were already too close to the crossing and began to slowly descend to the river.

The bridge looks very symbolic, it divides the canvas into two parts in the center in the vertical direction and attracts attention. Not immediately noticeable, but on both sides of the wooden ford the picture is very different. Bottom left, you can observe turbulent waters, streaked with a mass of small waves, from the wind or a strong current, the moisture is literally streaked with bumps. Immediately on the left, closer to the viewer, is a dark wooden road, cutting off at the whirlpool.

On the right is a completely different picture. The water is even and smooth as a stretched drum, the gaze glides over the fertile land covered with lush grass that ends at the bridge. It would seem that after all these two parts are separated by only three logs, but the nature of nature is changing dramatically. The thin bridge seems to pass between the two worlds, life calms down in this remote place and the viewer himself can choose which path he will take: calm and sunny or hard and exciting.

The choice is multifaceted. Not in vain, Levitan draws precisely three logs as a border. This is seen as true Christian symbolism. Perhaps the artist, therefore, says that any choice, in the end, is predetermined.





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Watch the video: Исаак Левитан У омута (January 2021).